Fascinating Pictures And Tale Of “The Smoke That Thunders”


There are many fabulous things people ought to know about Southern Africa. Yet, the moment you mention Southern Africa, the response you’ll likely get will come with words like “apartheid,” “Mugabe,” “Zuma,” “Pistorius” or “xenophobia“.

Guys, Southern Africa has many cool and positive things to talk about. Yep, a lot of cool things like the Victoria Falls that yields scenery smoke that thunders. Okay, don’t take the previous statement literal, I’m just saying that you probably, like me, have never read nor seen pictures of the world’s wonder – Victoria Falls in Southern Africa, but can however, tell about all the negative and not-too-pleasant things about the region.

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Well, that’s about to change as the fascinating facts you’ll read here, along with the appealing pictures of “The Smoke That Thunders,” will effectively ensure that. I was fortunate to visit the falls recently, hopefully, you’ll get your chance to visit someday. Until then, let me share what I saw with you as I’m feeling very generous.

The Smoke That Thunders

To Start with, the Victoria Falls’ indigenous name is Mosi-oa-Tunya. The meaning? – “The Smoke That Thunders”. It’s a waterfall you’ll find in Southern Africa on Zambezi River at the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe if you’re ever fortunate to visit this part of the world.

Victoria Fall.jpg1

The falls was an exclusive view for the Southern African ancestors until the 16th day of November 1855 when a Scottish missionary and explorer named David Livingstone encountered the thundering smoke and viewed it from a land mass in the middle of the river. I wasn’t there but I can tell David was enchanted and mesmerized. He documented that “no one can imagine the beauty of the view from anything witnessed in England. It had never been seen before by European eyes; but scenes so lovely must have been gazed upon by angels in their flight.” And immediately named what he saw to honor Queen Victoria. It’s not important but let’s just add that Queen Victoria was the Queen of the United Kingdom, Great Britain and Ireland between 1837 to 1901.

Victoria Fall 2

Due to the magnificent posture of the falls, many erroneously regard it as the highest, or widest waterfall in the world, it is not. Albeit, it’s the largest when you consider its enormous width of 5,604 ft and 354 ft height. With those, the falls is the world’s largest curtain of falling water.

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Victoria Fall 3

Thundering smoke consists of five different falls. You’ll find four in Zimbabwe, and the other in Zambia. The one in Zambia is known as the Eastern Cataract whereas those in Zimbabwe are the Devil’s Cataract, Main Falls (the most the most imposing falls), Horseshoes Falls (falls are shaped like a horseshoe), and the Rainbow Falls.

Rainbow Falls

Rainbow Falls obviously got its name from the charming daylight rainbow that sprays across the falls which is replaced by an enchanting moon-bow at full moon.

Moonbow at Vic Falls

At the Zambian end, there’s a “Devils Pool” and between the months of September to December, you can get to dare the devil there on the edge of the waterfalls. During these months, the flows are minimal and as such, one can swim and splash around the naturally formed Devil’s pool which is quite close to the point where the water descends over the falls. I was discouraged from daring the devil when I was told that people do occasionally slip over the rock barrier and plunge to death.


Due to the constant spray from the waterfalls, the Zambezi rain forest is often regarded as a place where it’s always raining in the world. River Zambezi is the fourth largest river in Africa, a major portion of the river is located within Zimbabwe and Zambia. Parts of the river are however found in Angola, Namibia, Mozambique and Botswana.

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