Finally, Embattled Traffic Boss With Outrageous Number Of Personal Security Guards Resigns

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BuzzSouthAfrica has confirmed the resignation of Bafana Mahlabe – Ekurhuleni’s Metro Department traffic chief.

The traffic boss dropped his resignation amid controversies and a court matter regarding his fitness to hold office. His woes began shortly after he took up the position just over a year ago.

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It was alleged that the traffic boss has never served in the traffic department until his position as Ekurhuleni Metro Department traffic chief.

Other sources confirmed that prior to his resignation, he approved overtime for nine security officials at an additional 84 hours per month to take care of his house, despite having four security guards at his private home.

According to DA Gauteng MPL Michele Clark, “Mr. Bafana Mahlabe already has five guards patrolling his private residence, and the DA has in its possession a letter requesting an additional four.”

Clarke also divulged that part of the duties of the five guards was to take Mahlebe’s wife to the doctor, and his children to school on a regular basis.



Speaking further, the opposition MPL argued that it’s unfair and an abuse of the public resources to order security personnel take care of the traffic boss’ domestic affairs.

Clarke vowed that the DA will request community safety MEC, Sizakele Nkosi-Malobane, to investigate his conduct as a matter of urgency.

Making public Mahlabe’s resignation on Wednesday, Ekuthuleni mayor Mzwandile Masina related that the traffic boss’ resignation follows his decision to pursue other business interests.

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Meanwhile, General Isaac Mapiyeye will be taking Mahlabe’s position for the next three months, with effect from December 1.

Mayor Masina disclosed that General Mapiyeye would be stepping in as the acting traffic chief with effect from 1 December until the position is filled within the next three months, as prescribed by a relevant legislation.

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