These Parts Of Northern Joburg Will Be Without Water From Tuesday

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While drought tightens its grip in all parts of the southern Africa, latest report has it that parts of the Northern Joburg will suffer lack of water supply due to due to a burst 450mm line in Steyn City.

Johannesburg Water tweeted via ‏@JHBWater that a large part of the Northern Joburg city would be under pipeline repair from 7am until 8pm, so the utility warned that “water will be off for a longer period”.

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The part that would be affected by this include: Northriding‚ Craigavon‚ Maroeladal‚ Bloubosrand‚ Cedar Lakes‚ Cedar Creek‚ Witkoppen‚ JHB North‚ Kya Sand and Farmhall.

The Johannesburg Water, however, promised to make provision for water through water tankers which would go round schools in the  affected areas across Northern Joburg, to dispatch water.

The utility also urged residents to “please spread the message to all your neighbors so that they prepare themselves before water is completely off in the areas”.



Meanwhile, the Johannesburg Water utility had continued to tell residents to learn how to reduce water wastage‚ noting that “Vaal Dam levels have dropped down to 27% from 27.5%” from last Monday.

The city of Johannesburg has been reportedly forced to cut down water supplies to some suburbs as reservoirs failed to meet up with demand from residents during a weekend heatwave.

Parts of Soweto were among the areas which will be cut off by Monday

“The following areas will be without water until the system recovers sufficiently to restore supply‚ all of Diepkloof‚ Orlando East and parts of Orlando West‚” said Joburg Water.

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The city is still under level two water restrictions but has struggled to reduce consumption. As a way to further restrict water usage and improve consumption, the Department of Water and Sanitation has imposed a 15% restriction on the use of water by municipalities due to ongoing drought and low dam levels.