“I’m Not Dying, Shame On You” Mugabe Mocks Desperate Zimbabweans


Now where are those Zimbabweans wishing Africa’s oldest sitting president was dead? The 92-year-old President Mugabe said don’t waste your time as he is still alive and bubbling.

Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe has on Thursday lashed out at potential successors who wish to see him dead any time soon. To them he says “I am not dying, shame on you”

Speaking to a meeting of about 10 000 veterans of Zimbabwe’s 1970s independence war, President Mugabe talked about how his trips to Malaysia and Singapore had the media spreading rumor of his ill-health and possible death and how the ruling Zanu-PF is engaged with a fresh fight on who succeeds him.

Also See: Blame Zimbabwean For My Long Stay In Power – President Mugabe

“You then see a stampede now, they will be saying the president is dying. I am not dying, shame on you,” Mugabe said during the first ever such meeting with the veterans. He added that only Zimbabweans have the right to send him out.

“I am there at the mercy of the people. If the people say no, go, I go. But if the people say no, we still want you, I stay on,” he said at a sports center in Harare.

Thursday’s meeting came at a time of high tensions in ZANU-PF as party officials position themselves as possible successors of Mugabe. But the 92-year-old reiterate that his successor would be decided democratically and that his wife, Grace, would not automatically inherit the role.

Mugabe therefore urged Zimbabweans and the ruling Zanu-PF supporters to unite against foreign enemies he said wanted to destroy the southern African nation.

However, while addressing his first open meeting with war veterans since fighting ended with Zimbabwe’s independence in 1980, the president apologized for not meeting with them for that long but promised to give them required attention.

Also See: Zimbabwe Suffers Another Cash Shortage

“The condition of the war veterans is a priority and I leave you with my promise,” he said, vowing to allocate money to pay for hospital bills and children’s school fees.

Though the Thursday meeting had been referred to by the media, as an occasion that will finally spilt up the ruling Zanu-PF, especially after Mugabe said last month that the veterans had indicated they wanted him to retire.

The meeting turned out successful with the veterans pledging support and loyalty to the president. They also presented a list of grievances and demands for top positions in government and state-owned firms, diplomatic posts and at least a fifth of all farmland and mining concessions.

“We played a role in the liberation of our country,” Menias Chimbaira, 62, told AFP.

“We need to remind the younger generations, especially the young politicians, to accord us our right place.”

The veterans who numbered 30 000 in total, also requested for an increase in their monthly allowances from $260. But Mugabe said the government would only meet such demands if it had the resources. He said Zimbabwe’s bad record with debtors was holding back potential funding from China, Japan and India.

“We have a disease in Zimbabwe where we just want to receive and forget that debts are supposed to be repaid. It’s a very bad culture,” said Mugabe

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