67,000 South Africans Have Joined The Jobless Flock

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Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) has released the Quarterly Employment Statistics for the second quarter of 2016 which disclosed that 67,000 South Africans have joined the large number of the country’s unemployed.

Yes, the stats reflected a decrease of 67 000 jobs. And, according to Statistician General Pali Lehohla, the job losses happened in all industries except electricity and construction.

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The stats captured that 48,000 jobs were lost in community, social and personal services. Manufacturing lost 7,000 jobs, transport and communication another 7,000. Trade declined by 4,000 and mining, 1,000.

As learnt the job losses in the manufacturing sector were recorded in the manufacturing of food products, beverages and tobacco products. Also, losses were recorded in the manufacturing of textiles, clothing and leather goods.

Howbeit, it wasn’t all the way bad. Jobs in the construction industry increased by 0.2%. The industry employed additional 1,000 South Africans for the period under review.

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The data as well indicated an increase in the gross earnings paid to employees. It increased by 0.01% from R523,311 million to R523,343 million.

Majority of the increase were identified in the community services, transport, construction, manufacturing, mining and quarrying, trade and electricity industries.

The average monthly earning paid to employees  increased by 7.5% from R16,787 to R18,045.

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Lehohla remarked that the figures are reflecting tough economic conditions.

“The economic conditions are quite stiff” he said. “In the second quarter, Gross Domestic Product (GDP) came out strongly at 3.3% on the back of mining and manufacturing, yet in both industries, jobs have been lost in the second quarter. We can read adequately that the growth in GDP largely was a result of base effects,” added the Statistician General.

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